Publications

Discipline wise list of recent selected publications

'Amending History': Review of 'Sixteen Stormy Days', by Tripurdaman Singh

Sixteen Stormy Days is a study of independent India's first constitutional crisis. The crisis arose out of a series of adverse court judgments in 1950-51 which placed obstacles in the way of the Congress government's ambitious social agenda, as well its ability to maintain law and order. In May 1951, the government moved to amend the Constitution to undo the effects of these judgments. The Constitution (First Amendment) Act was passed in June, following a bitter battle in Parliament.
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Published in India Today, issue of 23 March 2020

Civil liberties in the early constitution: The CrossRoads and Organiser cases

In this paper I examine in detail the background of two important free speech cases from 1950, one brought on behalf of the Communist-leaning magazine, CrossRoads, and the other by the RSS organ, 'Organiser'. I relate these to a lost tradition in Indian liberalism, which made space for ideological opponents to ally on matters of constitutional rights.

Published in 'Human Rights in India', edited by Satvinder Juss (Routledge, 2019).

Candidates Shortlisted for English Language Instructor (Visiting Position)

On the basis of the written test held on 13 Feb 2019, the following candidates have been shortlisted for the interview. The interview would be held at 4.30PM on 13 Feb 2019 in the office of the Head of the Department, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, 5th Floor, Main Building, IIT Delhi.

Candidates are to carry all documents for verification.

The names appear in reverse alphbetical order:

Caste

This article discusses the transformation of caste in the Indian context. The article starts with a discussion of the Indological and anthropological accounts of caste and then examines whether “caste” is essentially unique to Hinduism. Furthermore, the article discusses the possibility of mobility within the ritual hierarchy of caste.

Matrimonial

The business of matchmaking, performed in open market matrimonial negotiations, has not just helped brides and grooms find their ‘perfect match’, ‘soulmate’, ‘right person’, ‘life partner’, ‘true happiness’, and so on, they have also helped strengthen the ‘community’ through what Dumont called ‘endo-recruiting’. The modernity of matrimonials has reinvented the traditional marriage system, combined the best of both love and arranged marriage, and provided ‘individual’ as well as ‘social’ compatibility to candidates and their families.

The Different Ways in Which Aadhaar Infringes on Privacy

Privacy has been a key focus in the recent debate on Aadhaar. This is a very welcome development. Privacy is being interpreted in different, equally valid, ways by different sets of people. But the differences in interpretations are not always obvious to those who participate in the discussions. For instance, when computer scientists use the word privacy, they tend to it interpret from a narrow ‘data security’ perspective, whereas the lawyers in the Supreme Court have been highlighting the civil liberties angle to it.

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