Economics

Economics

Economics Faculty

Assistant Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor
Adjunct professor

Economics Courses

Course Number: HSL719 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The primary objective of this course is to provide an advanced treatment of econometric methods for cross section and panel data including linear and non-linear models. Some selected topics are instrumental variable estimation, estimation of system of equations, estimation of panel data models, maximum likelihood estimation, generalised method of moments, discrete response models, censored regression models and estimation of average treatment effects.

Course Number: HSL811 | Credits:
Course Objective:

Primary objective of this course is to introduce students with the process of economic growth and the long run sources of differences in economic performances across nations. Emphasis will be placed on developing theoretical toolkit in understanding growth mechanics. It is intended that this course will make students learn some of the workhorse models in modern macroeconomics, namely - Solow-Swan model, endogenous growth models, Keynesian and heterodox models, etc.

Course Number: HSP611 | Credits:
Course Objective:

Economics has a significant component of experimentation and data analytics. This course covers advanced topics of economics laboratory course as a continuation of economics laboratory I course. We cover experimental methods and computational techniques using real life data. Data analysis and experimental methods of analysis feature prominently in this course.

Course Number: HSL812 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This is an advanced level course in trade. The objective of this course would be to give adequate training to graduate students in economics (and related disciplines) to bring them to the forefront of knowledge in international trade and prepare them to undertake independent work in the areas of trade theory and policy.

Course Number: HSL820 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course will introduce students to advanced topics in Economics as decided by the instructor.

Course Number: HUL 311 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

This module introduces students in economics and other social sciences to game theory, a theory of interactive decision making. This module provides students with the basic solution concepts for different types of non-cooperative games, including static and dynamic games under complete and incomplete information. The basic solution concepts that this module covers are Nash equilibrium, subgame perfect equilibrium, Bayesian equilibrium, and perfect Bayesian equilibrium. This module emphasizes the applications of game theory to economics, such as duopolies, bargaining, and auctions.

Course Number: HSL614 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course deals with the economics of development, focusing on both the theoretical debates and experiences of economic transformations from various parts of the world. It aims to equip the students with an understanding of structural transformation, development planning, agriculture-industry linkages, industrialization debates, and international trade and finance. Students will also be made familiar with issues of poverty, distribution, and social development

Course Number: HSL720 | Credits:
Course Objective:

On successful completion of this course, a student should be able to understand the important economic reasons for enormous worldwide disparities in income levels and standards of living. Using a selection of the most important papers currently on the frontier of in this field, we will explore two particular questions: 1) Why do people in some countries live prosperous lives, while those in others reel under poverty? and 2) What are potential policies which can improve the lives of the poor? Topics of particular interest are those relating to institution, culture, gender, health, political economy, corruption and conflict.

Course Number: HUL 312 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Though empirical questions are central in motivating the issues on distribution, this course will mostly draw from theory. Papers published in established journals will cover the major references for this course. It will start from some empirical pattern of development (Kuznet‘s hypothesis), country experiences, etc. to motivate the subject. Then it will try to understand the process of distribution, growth and structural change using standard macroeconomic models. This course will be heavily dependent on Mathematics - mainly calculus.

Course Number: HUL 315 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Basics of sample survey; variance and covariance; correlation coefficient; simple regression analysis; Gauss-Markov theorem; estimation of regression coefficients; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing in regression analysis; type-I and type-II errors; transformation of variables; multiple regression analysis; multicollinearity, heteroscedaticity, dummy variables, basics of time-series analysis.

Course Number: HSL613 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to provide introduction to econometric theory and practice. The linear regression model is the main focus of this course. The topics covered in the course include Gauss-Markov assumptions, Small and Large sample properties of least square estimator. Then we proceed to violation of assumptions of Gauss-Markov Theorem, which include heteroskedasticity, autocorrelation, measurement error, omitted variables and simultaneity. We also cover generalized regression models, endogeneity and instrumental variable estimation, limited dependent variable models. We also introduce basic econometric methods with time series and panel data.

Course Number: HSP511 | Credits:
Course Objective:

Economics has a significant component of experimentation and data analytics. This course introduces students to experimental methods and computational techniques using real life data. Data analysis and experimental methods of analysis feature prominently in this course.

Course Number: HSL813 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The course builds on microeconomic and mathematical tools to formalize decision-making by economic agents under different environments, e.g. framing, uncertainty, competitive bidding, tacit collusion etc. Starting from the basic models of consumer’s behavior, the course aims to build advanced theoretical tools to analyze behavioral aspects of physical and virtual market. Various cases (e.g. online purchase, e-auctions, spectrum auctions, tacit business-links etc.) from recent marketing literature would be analyzed with respect to decision-theoretic tools established in the course.

Course Number: HSL816 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The aim of the course is to make the students familiar with the
most fundamental concepts and results of game theory. This forms the first part of a sequence of two courses on game theory. On successful completion of this course (and the subsequent second part of the course), the students are expected to make clear how game theory and mechanism
design can be applied to their own research. Our intention is
to present the theory with formal proofs of the main theorems including a number of
examples and short questions to enliven the presentation. The course will also include
a number of elaborate exercises, enabling the students to apply these concepts in problem settings.

Course Number: HSL817 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic economic concepts related to health, health care, and health financing. After completion of the course the students shall be able to apply various economic tools for the analysing health outcomes, health care costs, and health policy in developing countries. The students opting for the course are expected to possess basic understanding of microeconomics.

Course Number: HUL 316 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The course is aimed at developing an understanding of the economic issues in a range of economic activities in the Indian economy. The themes that can be covered include performance of the Indian Economy since 1951, agricultural growth in India, inter-regional variation in growth of output and productivity, farm price policy, recent trends in industrial growth, industrial and licensing policy, policy changes for industrial growth, economic reforms and liberalization, population growth, unemployment, food and nutrition security, and education. It will also include some contemporary issues.

Course Number: HSL515 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course aims to equip the students with a good understanding of India’s economic problems. The development challenges faced by India during the colonial period and again during the initial decades after independence will be discussed in detail. The primary concern of the course will be on contemporary issues, including social inequalities, constraints to agricultural and industrial growth, and the revolution in the services sector. The coursework will emphasise on a set of readings, classroom interactions and debates.

Course Number: HSL716 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The course provides a graduate level introduction to Industrial Organization. It is designed to provide a broad introduction to topics that current researchers are studying in the areas of industrial organization. It will expose students to a wide variety of techniques in the area of industrial economics and applied game theory. The course will try to integrate theoretical models as well as empirical studies on industries.

Course Number: HUL 314 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Basic concepts of national income accounting, money, and balance of payments; output and exchange-rate determination under fixed and flexible exchange-rate regimes; fiscal and monetary policies in an open economy; international capital movements and their impacts; Case Studies: East Asian crisis, global financial crisis; theories of international trade including factor-proportions and economies of scale; the international trading regime and its implications for developing countries.

Course Number: HSL714 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course deals with international trade and finance, covering both the theoretical models and policy experiences. The course will help students understand questions such as how and why countries trade with each other and on how the globalization of finance poses challenges to macroeconomic policymaking. It will also cover historical and contemporary issues in in-ternational economics.

Course Number: HUL 211 | Credits:
Course Objective:
Course Number: HSL514 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The course aims to introduce the students to broad issues of development, particularly from an Indian or developing country context. The topics covered in the course relate to not only issues of economic development but also other hurdles faced by developing societies, which have deeper historical and political roots. The course will equip the students with a good understanding of the problems of development, and provide them a larger perspective to the economic theories they will learn in other courses.

Course Number: HSL818 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The primary objective of this course is to provide an introduction to the study of labour markets with particular emphasis on India.

Course Number: HUL 213 | Credits:
Course Objective:
Course Number: HSL711 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This is a graduate course in development economics from macroeconomic perspective. The objective of the course will be to understand topics of interest in the intersection between development economics and applied macroeconomics. The course requires basic understanding of the workhorse models of modern macroeconomics and some applied skills at the level of intermediate econometrics.

Course Number: HSL713 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course aims to introduce advanced macroeconomic theory and policies. It deals with the main principles of the determination of real income, employment, price level and exchange rates. It provides an understanding of the contending macroeconomic theories, including the Classical, Keynesian and Monetarist analyses. The course discusses macroeconomic policies, as also the challenges in implementing them in a globalized economy.

Course Number: HSL512 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course aims to introduce advanced macroeconomic theory and policies. It deals with the main principles of the determination of real income, employment, price level and exchange rates. It provides an understanding of the contending macroeconomic theories, including the Classical, Keynesian, Monetarist, Real Business Cycles and Dynamic Macroeconomics. The course discusses macroeconomic policies, as also the challenges in implementing them in a globalized economy.

Course Number: HSL612 | Credits:
Course Objective:

Primary objective of this course is to introduce students with the process of economic growth and the long run sources of differences in economic performances across nations. Emphasis will be placed on developing theoretical toolkit in understanding growth mechanics. It is intended that this course will make students learn some of the workhorse models in modern macroeconomics, namely - Solow-Swan model, endogenous growth models, Ramsey and dynamic macroeconomic models, heterodox models, etc.

Course Number: HSL516 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The aims of this course are to:
(i) equip students with understanding of the most important mathematical techniques used in modern economics;
(ii) illustrate the use of these techniques by applying them to various well-known economic models;
(iii) complement the postgraduate microeconomic and macroeconomic theory courses.
 

Course Number: HUL 212 | Credits:
Course Objective:
Course Number: HSL712 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course aims to introduce the students to formalization of individual decision making and various facets of it under different perspectives- when the individual is a consumer (consumer’s choice, demand, dilemmas etc.) or when she is a producer (profit maximization or cost minimization, characterization of different market structures under various degree of market power). Finally, the course discusses different aspects of decision-making under uncertainty.

Course Number: HSL511 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course aims to introduce the students to formalization of individual decision making and various facets of it under different perspectives- when the individual is a consumer (consumer's choice, demand, dilemmas etc.) or when she is a producer (profit maximization or cost minimization, characterization of different market structures under various degree of market power). Finally, the course discusses different aspects of decision-making under uncertainty.

Course Number: HSL611 | Credits:
Course Objective:

One part of this course aims to introduce the students to the set-up of general equilibrium model especially following Arrow-Debreu framework. Existence, stability and other properties of such equilibria are formally discussed. The other part of the course aims to introduce the students to game theory. Basic model of complete information simultaneous move games is set up and the notion of Nash equilibrium is introduced. Properties of Nash equilibrium are discussed in details, particularly with the help of several examples. Next the concept of sequential games is introduced and examples are used to define the notion of subgame perfect equilibrium in this setting.

Course Number: HSL717 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course aims to provide various perspectives on India’s economic development. Development debates on India’s economic transformation from the colonial period will illuminate the discussions. The primary concern will be on contemporary issues, including social inequalities, constraints to agricultural and industrial growth, and the revolution in the services sector. The coursework will emphasize on a set of readings, classroom interactions and debates.

Course Number: HUL 736 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

Economic growth. Economic development. Historic growth and contemporary development. Lessons and controversies. Characteristics of developing countries. Obstacles to development. Structural changes in the process of economic development. Relationship between agriculture and industry. Strategies of economic development. Balanced/ Unbalanced growth. International trade and economic development. Population. Planning for economic development. Use of input-output model and linear programming techniques in planning. Indian plan experience. Strategy of Indian planning. Indian plan models.

Course Number: HSL718 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course provides a political economy perspective on economic growth and development, drawing both from the Indian and international experiences. It discusses development histories, contemporary economic issues, and also future economic challenges. The topics covered include industrialization, economic planning, international trade, financial crises, poverty, and labour migration.

Course Number: HSL513 | Credits:
Course Objective:

The primary objective of this course is to provide introduction to Probability and Statistics for quantitative analysis in economics. This course builds upon statistical foundations of econometric methodologies that are useful in empirical research. Students will be introduced to the major quantitative techniques that social scientists use to test models, study economic behaviour, evaluate policies, and relationships between variables. The topics covered in the course include basic probability theory and mathematical statistics, linear regression models and its applications.

Course Number: HUL 318 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The course is aimed at developing an understanding of the basics in Public Economics and Public Finance. Public economics is the study of government policy from the points of view of economic efficiency and equity. The course deals with the nature of government intervention and its implications for allocation, distribution and stabilization. Inherently, this study involves a formal analysis of government taxation and expenditures. The subject encompasses a host of topics including public goods, market failures and externalities. The course is divided into two sections, one dealing with the theory of public economics and the other with the Indian public finances.

Course Number: HUL 735 | Credits: 2
Course Objective:

This course will introduce students to methods of quantitative economic research using primary and secondary data source. The purpose is to provide training for Ph.D. scholars in the department

Course Number: HSL814 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course will introduce students to methods of quantitative economic research using primary and secondary data source. The purpose is to provide training for Ph.D. scholars in the department.

Course Number: HSP520 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course is the first part of two semester long research project for M.Sc. (Economics) students. The students engage in collaborative research with a faculty guide. The objective is to prepare students in identifying research problems, formulating research questions, analysing them, and writing the final dissertation.

Course Number: HSP620 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course is the second (final) part of two semester long research project for M.Sc. (Economics) students. The students engage in collaborative research with a faculty guide. The objective is to prepare students in identifying research problems, formulating research questions, analysing them, and writing the final dissertation.

Course Number: HSP612 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This research seminar course provides a forum for students to discuss and generate ideas on issues related to a variety of economic problems. Students conduct an in-depth study of a research topic of their choice under the guidance of faculty members. This prepares the students to undertake project work in subsequent semester. Discussion of issues with experts in the field of research is the central component of this course. Attending talk by faculty members, PhD scholars and invited speakers in seminar series is compulsory. The students will be asked to prepare review report of a paper presented in the seminar. They learn to work in discussion groups, debate and problem solve on selected issues. In the research seminar, the students are given an opportunity to integrate their knowledge, skills and practical experience gained in the program.

Course Number: HUL 320 | Credits: 3
Course Objective:

The course will introduce students to selected topics in Economics as decided by the instructor.

Course Number: HUV 887 | Credits: 1
Course Objective:

Estimation and inference in two variable model; OLS assumption; Extension of the two variable model; OLS assumption : autocorrelation, multicollinearity, and heteroskedasticity, models with limited dependent variables : LPM, log it, and probit; Panel data modelling: fixed effect and random effect models; Time series analysis : introduction to non-stationarity, AR and MA modelling.

Course Number: HSL815 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This forms the second part of two-part game theory course intended for the masters program at IIT Delhi. After formalization of standard game theory models and some examples in game theory 1, in this course, we introduce concepts of cooperative game theory and advanced topics such as mechanism design and implementation theory. After studying this course the students are expected to be comfortable in reading the journal articles on game theory, mechanism design, and implementation theory and also develop fresh models to close the gaps in the existing literature or ideate problems in these fields.

Course Number: HSL715 | Credits:
Course Objective:

This course will cover time series econometrics and forecasting with focus on applications in macroeconomics and international finance. It introduces students to time series regression models, its estimation, inference and forecasting. The objective of the course is for students to get hands-on experience with analyzing economic time series data. Accordingly, the emphasis of the course is on empirical applications.